UNCAPPED Queenslander Joe Burns has beaten former Test opener Ed Cowan to the punch and will play for Australia in the Boxing Day Test.

JUST because Australia is short of batting talent does not mean it should hand out gold passes to players who are struggling to deliver.

MIKE Hussey​ and Jacques Kallis proved class is ageless when they guided the Sydney Thunder to a comfortable win over the Brisbane Heat.

MELBOURNE City’s derby hero Erik Paartalu said his side’s win was a crucial step in bridging the gap to big brother Melbourne Victory.

NATHAN Burns fires Phoenix into top four — and himself firmly into the Socceroos’ Asian Cup frame. Read our Round 11 A-League review.

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About the Melbourne Cricket Club

The Melbourne Cricket Club is a unique organisation.  It is a private club, incorporated under the Melbourne Cricket Club Act 1974, boasting by far the biggest membership of any sporting club in Australia.

The MCC also has the public responsibility of managing one of the largest and the most successful stadiums in Australia and the world – the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG).

Assuming occupancy of the MCG’s present site (its fourth) in 1853, the MCC has 103,400 members (comprising 62,400 Full members and 41,000 Restricted members).   There are more than 236,000 people on the waiting list. Between 10,000 and 15,000 people are nominated for membership each year.*

Along with the playing of cricket, today's MCC is an umbrella organisation for hundreds of participants in 12 sporting sections - baseball, bowls, croquet, football, golf, hockey, lacrosse, netball, real tennis, target shooting, squash and tennis.

The club's principal public role, however, remains the progressive management and development of the MCG - a stadium which shares a unique relationship with its local community and boasts a rare magnetism in attracting visitors from all corners of the globe.

Management of the ground is vested in the MCC by the government-appointed MCG Trust and an Act of Parliament guarantees the club's occupation of about 20 per cent of the stadium for its Members Reserve.

The keenness of Melburnians to belong to their cricket club and retain membership, usually for life, has been a major factor in enabling the club to develop the stadium, until the early nineties, almost exclusively through the use of members' funds.

*Figures as at August 31, 2014.